Science, Technology, and Human Values
Duke University Box 90400
Durham, NC 27708
katie.watchman@duke.edu
919-668-1934

Science, Technology, and Human Values

Box 90400
Duke University
Durham, NC 27708
katie.watchman@duke.edu
919-668-1934

ATTENTION: The STHV instructional videos webpage has moved. Please update your bookmark to: http://www.isis.duke.edu/sthv/videos.html.


March 24, 2003

I would like to provide an update on the Program in Science, Technology and Human Values (STHV). It has been decided that in light of the many changes and new emphases at Duke in recent years that an independent program addressing ethical, policy and analytical aspects of science is no longer needed. Therefore, we are sunsetting STHV after this semester.

Over the past two years, I have met with many of you to ascertain the best means for providing coursework and enrichment opportunities for our students and faculty and I am pleased to report that many of your desires will be realized through a number of initiatives at the University level. Some noteworthy examples are the Information Sciences + Information Studies (ISIS) program, new science clusters in the Markets and Management (MMS) program, as well as some exciting new initiatives by the Jenkins Chair and the Center for Genome, Ethics, Law and Policy (GELP). Structural curriculum changes also provide much of what we have strived for in STHV, especially those of Curriculum 2000 and FOCUS. In addition to GELP and biomedical ethics initiatives of the School of Medicine, the University has invested widely in science ethics, including numerous seminars and activities by the Kenan Center for Ethics and the Center for Academic Integrity, as well as the Graduate School’s Responsible Conduct of Research program.

I have said all of this to assure you that the sunset of STHV is occurring at an optimal time. There are still some details that we need to work out and a few favors that I may need to ask of you during the transition.

This semester, about 120 students are enrolled in STHV courses. We will continue to offer EGR108S, Ethics in Professions, in the Fall and Spring. I have begun discussions with ISIS and MMS about possible replacement courses for STHV112 and 113. We have enlisted an excellent cadre of module instructors over the years. They cover a wide array of topics important to science and society. I will leave these names with the ISIS program and encourage you to contact them for your courses and seminars. I am also working closely with the Pratt School to find ways to ensure that our engineering students continue to avail themselves to ethics and policy considerations throughout their Duke experience. I am very encouraged by our discussions to date.

STHV was the first and longest running undergraduate enrichment program at Duke. I am very proud of my association with the program, and even more so the people who conceived and implemented it. I am honored to have benefited from the insights of Sy Mauskopf, Alex Roland and Aarne Vesilind. I consider them to be not only my confessors and colleagues, but my true friends.

I will continue to teach 108 and participate in science and ethics initiatives at Duke and look forward to our continued collaborations. Thank you for making STHV a success and may God bless you.

Daniel A. Vallero, Ph.D.
Co-Director, STHV