APSI Community/Outreach: School Programs

APSI arranges cultural programs on campus at Duke and at area schools free of charge. Educators can enhance and expand units on East Asia with hands-on activities and cultural performances. We also partner with organizations at Duke to provide larger performances on campus.

Please subscribe to APSI’s East Asian Studies for Educators listserv to receive announcements of these and other opportunities. To subscribe, please contact apsi@duke.edu.

PAST SCHOOL PROGRAMS

2014 APSI Summer Institute on East Asia for K-12 Educators
“Human and Natural Environments in East Asia”

Presented by the Asian/Pacific Studies Institute at Duke University
Funded by a U.S. Department of Education Title VI grant

Monday, July 21 – Tuesday, July 22: Elementary and Middle School Educators
Monday, July 28 – Tuesday, July 29: Middle and High School Educators
Participants must choose ONE workshop and commit to the full 2 days.
Registration fee: $35

This year’s Summer Institute will explore environments in East Asia from a variety of perspectives, in ways that can be incorporated into many different grade levels and subject areas. “Environment” simply means everything that surrounds us in a given place or context, including natural, physical environments as well as cultural, historical environments. East Asia encompasses an incredible diversity of environments, in all senses of the term.
In these workshops, we’ll use framework of “Human and Natural Environments” to look at topics ranging from the role of the natural world in Miyazaki’s anime films to Chongqing’s development trajectory; from population and food security to natural themes in Chinese painting; from Buddhism in everyday life in Taipei to monsters and robots in Asian monster movies and what they say about urban growth. Presenters will be Duke faculty and other scholars and educators. (Specific topics will be different in each 2-day workshop, to be announced soon.) Each workshop will also include breakout sessions with other teachers to discuss strategies for integrating this material into your classrooms, as well as networking opportunities over lunch.

Open to K-12 educators in any job category (i.e., media specialists, curriculum coordinators, and administrators, as well as teachers) who teach in or support classroom environments in North Carolina. All participants who complete a workshop will receive a $100 stipend and can claim one unit of renewal credit. Participants who live outside the Triangle will be offered one night of lodging for the workshop.

Admission is on a rolling, first-come, first-served basis; enrollment is limited to 25 in each workshop. Each educator may register for only ONE of the workshops. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email and will be asked to pay a $35 registration fee to secure your spot. Participants who live outside the Triangle will be offered one night of lodging for the workshop. Once all spaces are filled, a waitlist will be created.

To register, visit: http://tinyurl.com/APSIsummer2014

Workshop descriptions will be available soon on our website.

For more information, please contact apsi@duke.edu.

2014 APSI Summer Institute on East Asia for K-12 Educators
“Human and Natural Environments in East Asia”

Presented by the Asian/Pacific Studies Institute at Duke University
Funded by a U.S. Department of Education Title VI grant

Monday, July 21 – Tuesday, July 22: Elementary and Middle School Educators
Monday, July 28 – Tuesday, July 29: Middle and High School Educators
Participants must choose ONE workshop and commit to the full 2 days.
Registration fee: $35

This year’s Summer Institute will explore environments in East Asia from a variety of perspectives, in ways that can be incorporated into many different grade levels and subject areas. “Environment” simply means everything that surrounds us in a given place or context, including natural, physical environments as well as cultural, historical environments. East Asia encompasses an incredible diversity of environments, in all senses of the term.
In these workshops, we’ll use framework of “Human and Natural Environments” to look at topics ranging from the role of the natural world in Miyazaki’s anime films to Chongqing’s development trajectory; from population and food security to natural themes in Chinese painting; from Buddhism in everyday life in Taipei to monsters and robots in Asian monster movies and what they say about urban growth. Presenters will be Duke faculty and other scholars and educators. (Specific topics will be different in each 2-day workshop, to be announced soon.) Each workshop will also include breakout sessions with other teachers to discuss strategies for integrating this material into your classrooms, as well as networking opportunities over lunch.

Open to K-12 educators in any job category (i.e., media specialists, curriculum coordinators, and administrators, as well as teachers) who teach in or support classroom environments in North Carolina. All participants who complete a workshop will receive a $100 stipend and can claim one unit of renewal credit. Participants who live outside the Triangle will be offered one night of lodging for the workshop.

Admission is on a rolling, first-come, first-served basis; enrollment is limited to 25 in each workshop. Each educator may register for only ONE of the workshops. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email and will be asked to pay a $35 registration fee to secure your spot. Participants who live outside the Triangle will be offered one night of lodging for the workshop. Once all spaces are filled, a waitlist will be created.

To register, visit: http://tinyurl.com/APSIsummer2014

Workshop descriptions will be available soon on our website.

For more information, please contact apsi@duke.edu.

JAPANESE TAIKO DRUMMING CONCERT 
A Performance for K-12 Students at Duke University
Tuesday, March 11, 2014
10:00 – 11:00 am
Baldwin Auditorium, Duke University 
FREE of charge and appropriate for all ages

Duke Asian/Pacific Studies Institute (APSI) and Triangle Taiko are pleased to announce a morning concert of Japanese taiko drumming for K-12 school groups at Duke University's nearly renovated Baldwin Auditorium. The concert will include a short workshop with select members of the audience and curricular materials are available to enhance pre- or post-concert learning.

TO REGISTER:
Reservations will be taken on a first-come, first-served basis. School groups must be accompanied by appropriate chaperones and must arrange their own transportation. 
Please email Tanya Lee (tanya.lee@duke.edu) the following information by March 1, 2014:

Contact Name, with email and phone:
School Name:
Grade/s:
Number of students:
Number of adults (teachers, parents):

Driving directions, parking information and curricular materials will be provided upon registration.

For more information, please contact Tanya Lee (tanya.lee@duke.edu / 919-668-2280)

About Taiko
The word taiko (太鼓) means "big drum" in Japanese. Generally, it refers to all drums used in classical Japanese music, whether big or small. Outside Japan, the word refers to any Japanese drums (和太鼓 'wa-daiko' which means "Japanese drum") and to the recent art-form of ensemble taiko drumming (sometimes called, "kumi-daiko"). 

Taiko began in Japan around 2,000 years ago and has been used in wars and religious ceremonies, for insect control, entertainment and more. In Japan today, there are many festivals, performances and folk art demonstrations using drums, singing and other instruments such as fue (bamboo flute) or kane (cymbals). Taiko flourishes throughout Japan, and each district has developed its own rhythm and style.

The ensemble style of taiko performance featured in this concert began in the 1950s and has gained in popularity ever since, within and beyond Japan. Today, thousands of professional, recreational and collegiate groups play taiko in Japan. There are also children's taiko groups, and since 2003, taiko has been taught in elementary and middle schools in Japan.

The first taiko groups in the US were started mainly by Japanese Americans searching for a way to express their cultural identity. Asian Americans of other ethnicities soon became involved, and it now attracts the participation of many non-Asians as well.

Triangle Taiko
Founded in 2002, Triangle Taiko is an all-volunteer group dedicated to the exploration and performance of Taiko, Japanese traditional drum music. They perform regularly throughout the Triangle and beyond, including 5 school concerts at Duke in past years. For more information, visit: http://www.triangletaiko.org/


JAPANESE TRADITIONAL MUSIC CONCERT
A Performance for K-12 Students
Wednesday, February 20, 2013, 10-11am
Reynolds Theater, in Duke University’s Bryan Center
FREE of charge

James Nyoraku Schlefer (shakuhachi) and Yoko Reikano Kimura (koto) of Kyo-Shin-An Arts. The shakuhachi is an end-blown bamboo flute that has been performed in Japan for 1200 years. It is associated with Zen Buddhism and its repertoire tends to be reflective and meditative. The shakuhachi is also played in secular contexts, often accompanied by the koto. The koto is a plucked, 13-stringed zither that originated in China and came to Japan at least 1300 years ago. Originally a court instrument, the koto is now played in many contexts, with wide-ranging traditional and contemporary repertoires.

Follow the links above to the instruments to hear audio samples of the instruments. Teachers will be provided with materials to help prep their classes before the concert. Biographies of the musicians can be found below. They will be performing with Duke University’s Ciompi Quartet Friday evening, February 22, in a concert of groundbreaking new chamber music for Western string quartet with Japanese instruments (see Duke Events).

Registration is closed.


Artists in the Schools Program: Applications are now closed.

As you begin the 2011-2012 school year and prepare your lessons, consider expanding your units about East Asia or making cross-curricula connections with the following special artist presentations. These are available free of charge to a very limited number of classrooms. Applications submitted by September 16, 2011 will receive full consideration. Funding is limited. Priority will be given to teachers who have participated in recent APSI professional development programs, new schools that have yet to benefit from the APSI artists in the school program as well as schools that have the opportunity to implement an artist presentation across the curriculum. The following artists and presentations are available:

Chinese Calligraphy and Brush Painting Classes
Instructor: Jinxiu “Alice” Zhao

Explore Chinese calligraphy and brush painting with Alice Zhao as she teaches the history of calligraphy, Chinese characters, and introduces students to basic stroke and brush painting techniques. Students have the opportunity to learn simple lessons about the Chinese language while creating their own Chinese calligraphy and brush painting.

ONLINE CALLIGRAPHY LESSON PLAN

Japanese Haiku
Instructor: Richard Krawiec

Haiku is one of the most widely practiced forms of poetry in the world - and the form most frequently mistaught. Invented in the 17th Century by Japanese master poet Matsuo Basho, haiku is a short, lyrical poem that uses images of nature to reveal something about human nature. Internationally recognized Haiku poet Richard Krawiec will present a fun and challenging interactive classroom lesson where students will learn how to define haiku and work through the process to create some of their own.

Kamishibai: Japanese Story Telling in the Classroom

Instructor: Laurie Wolf, aka Mr. Who

Students have the opportunity to see traditional Japanese Kamishibai as told by Mr. Who. This style of picture storytelling in Japan is detailed in Allen Say’s book, Kamishibai Man. Mr. Who will share this performance art and engage students in traditional stories from Japan.

Please e-mail tanya.lee@duke.edu or call 919-668-2280 with questions.


CHINESE TRADITIONAL MUSICAL CONCERT
A Performance for K-12 Students
Tuesday, March 1, 2011
10:00 – 11:00 am
Baldwin Auditorium, Duke University

In recognition of Chinese New Year, the Asian/Pacific Studies Institute at Duke University in conjunction with the Mallarmé Chamber Players presented a Chinese traditional musical concert for K-12 students. Flyer and Program

JAPANESE TAIKO DRUMMING CONCERT

A Performance for K-12 Students Tuesday, November 16, 2010
10:00 – 11:00 am
Baldwin Auditorium, Duke University

In recognition of International Education Week, the Asian/Pacific Studies Institute at Duke University hosted a performance by Triangle Taiko. Flyer and Program

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