OIE Diversity Newslinks

Book of the Month

Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior

Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior

By Leonard Mlodinow

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday
Publication Date: February 12, 2013

Winner of the 2013 PEN/E.O. Wilson
Literary Science Writing Award

Our featured text for this edition of Newslinks is a useful and resourceful item to add to your personal and professional toolkit in the context of managing difference in the workplace – and beyond.

Over the past two decades of neurological research, it has become increasingly clear that the way we experience the world—our perception, behavior, memory, and social judgment—is largely driven by the mind's subliminal processes and not by the conscious ones, as we have long believed. As in the bestselling The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives, Leonard Mlodinow employs his signature concise, accessible explanations of the most obscure scientific subjects to unravel the complexities of the subliminal mind. In the process he shows the many ways it influences how we misperceive our relationships with family, friends, and business associates; how we misunderstand the reasons for our investment decisions; and how we misremember important events—along the way, changing our view of ourselves and the world around us.

Website Spotlight

Office of Minority Health

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services


About OMH

The Office of Minority Health (OMH) was created in 1986 and is one of the most significant outcomes of the 1985 Secretary's Task Force Report on Black and Minority Health. The Office is dedicated to improving the health of racial and ethnic minority populations through the development of health policies and programs that will help eliminate health disparities. OMH was reauthorized by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-148).

Why It Was Established

Poor health outcomes for African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders are apparent when comparing their health indicators against those of the rest of the U.S. population. These populations experience higher rates of illness and death from health conditions such as heart disease, stroke, specific cancers, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, asthma, hepatitis B, and overweight and obesity. OMH's primary responsibility is to improve health and healthcare outcomes for racial and ethnic minority communities by developing or advancing policies, programs, and practices that address health, social, economic, environmental and other factors which impact health.

What It Does

OMH programs address disease prevention, health promotion, risk reduction, healthier lifestyle choices, use of health care services, and barriers to health care

Health Resources and Services Administration

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


Health Resources and Services Administration

Cultural Competence Resource for Health Care Providers

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the primary Federal agency for improving access to health care services for people who are uninsured, isolated or medically vulnerable.

Culture, Language and Health Literacy

Effective health communication is as important to health care as clinical skill. To improve individual health and build healthy communities, health care providers need to recognize and address the unique culture, language and health literacy of diverse consumers and communities.

El Pueblo, Inc.
El Pueblo, Inc.

El Pueblo's mission is to effect positive social change through community collaboration and partnership, leadership development, advocacy, education, health promotion and cross-cultural understanding. El Pueblo envisions a just and equal community where all Latinos are respected, valued, and engaged across North Carolina.

Hispanic Heritage Month • Sept 15-Oct 15

Celebrating Hispanic Americans, their culture, and contributions to the United States

Hispanic Heritage Month begins on September 15, the anniversary of independence for five Latin American countries—Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico declared its independence on September 16, and Chile on September 18. The term "Hispanic" or "Latino," as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, refers to Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or ethnic origin regardless of race.

On the 2010 Census form, people of Spanish/Hispanic/Latino origin could identify themselves as Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano, Puerto Rican, Cuban, or "another Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin." According to the 2010 Census, 50.5 million people or 16% of the population are of Hispanic or Latino origin. This represents a significant increase from the 2000 Census, which registered the Hispanic population at 35.3 million or 13% of the total U.S. population.

Diversity Graphics celebrates National Hispanic Heritage Month

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