OIE Diversity Newslinks

Book of the Month


Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead


By Sheryl Sandberg
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication Date: March 11, 2013

Overview

Thirty years after women became 50 percent of the college graduates in the United States, men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in government and industry. This means that women’s voices are still not heard equally in the decisions that most affect our lives. In Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg examines why women’s progress in achieving leadership roles has stalled, explains the root causes, and offers compelling, commonsense solutions that can empower women to achieve their full potential.

Sandberg is the chief operating officer of Facebook and is ranked on Fortune’s list of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Business and as one of Time’s 100 Most Influential People in the World. In 2010, she gave an electrifying TEDTalk in which she described how women unintentionally hold themselves back in their careers. Her talk, which became a phenomenon and has been viewed more than two million times, encouraged women to “sit at the table,” seek challenges, take risks, and pursue their goals with gusto.

Website Spotlights

womenshistorymonth.gov

MARCH is Women's History Month!

The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of women whose commitment to nature and the planet have proved invaluable to society.

About Women's History Month

Women’s History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as “Women’s History Week." Throughout the next five years, Congress continued to pass joint resolutions designating a week in March as "Women’s History Week." In 1987 after being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project, Congress passed Pub. L. 100-9 which designated the month of March 1987 as “Women’s History Month." Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama have issued a series of annual proclamations designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.”

Executive and Legislative Documents
The Law Library of Congress has compiled guides to commemorative observations, including a comprehensive inventory of the Public Laws, Presidential Proclamations and congressional resolutions related to Women’s History Month.

Bessie Coleman: The First Female African American Pilot



Who Was the "Real" Rosie the Riveter?



Office on Women's Health

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Women's Health

The Office on Women's Health (OWH), part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), works to improve the health and sense of well-being of all U.S. women and girls.

OWH serves as the focal point for women's health activities across HHS offices and agencies and leads HHS efforts to ensure that all women and girls achieve the best possible health.

OWH has a national office in Washington, DC. Ten Regional Women's Health Coordinators are located throughout the country to serve women and girls through regional, state, and local public health initiatives.

Their mission is to provide national leadership and coordination to improve the health of women and girls through policy, education, and model programs. Our goals are to achieve this mission by:

  • Informing and advancing policies;
  • Educating the public;
  • Educating professionals; and
  • Supporting model programs.

Equity Alliance

www.equityallianceatasu.org

Equity Alliance

The Equity Alliance, directed by Alfredo J. Artiles and Elizabeth B. Kozleski, is devoted to research and school reform efforts that promote equity, access, participation and outcomes for all students. Committed to inclusive education, the Equity Alliance values diversity, pushes the boundaries of traditional thinking, and leads by example. The organization takes pride in creating, supporting and promoting educational systems and organizations that:

  • Eliminate achievement disparities
  • Develop inclusive learning environments
  • Uphold the civil rights of students
  • Harness the power of family and community involvement in schools and communities

Duke Spotlight


Duke Women's Center

About the Women's Center

The Duke University Women’s Center is dedicated to helping every woman at Duke become self-assured with a streetwise savvy that comes from actively engaging with the world. We welcome men and women alike who are committed to gender equity and social change.

Mission

The Duke University Women's Center promotes a campus culture that ensures the full participation and agency of women students at Duke.

And... What is a Womanist?

Alice Walker’s Definition of a “Womanist” from In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens: Womanist Prose, Copyright 1983.

1. From womanish. (Opp. of “girlish,” i.e., frivolous, irresponsible, not serious.) A black feminist or feminist of color. From the black folk expression of mothers to female children, “you acting womanish,” i.e., like a woman. Usually referring to outrageous, audacious, courageous or willful behavior. Wanting to know more and in greater depth than is considered “good” for one. Interested in grown up doings. Acting grown up. Being grown up. Interchangeable with another black folk expression: “You trying to be grown.” Responsible. In charge. Serious.

2. Also: A woman who loves other women, sexually and/or nonsexually. Appreciates and prefers women’s culture, women’s emotional flexibility (values tears as natural counterbalance of laughter), and women’s strength. Sometimes loves individual men, sexually and/or nonsexually. Committed to survival and wholeness of entire people, male and female. Not a separatist, except periodically, for health. Traditionally a universalist, as in: “Mama, why are we brown, pink, and yellow, and our cousins are white, beige and black?” Ans. “Well, you know the colored race is just like a flower garden, with every color flower represented.” Traditionally capable, as in: “Mama, I’m walking to Canada and I’m taking you and a bunch of other slaves with me.” Reply: “It wouldn’t be the first time.”

3. Loves music. Loves dance. Loves the moon. Loves the Spirit. Loves love and food and roundness. Loves struggle. Loves the Folk. Loves herself. Regardless.

4. Womanist is to feminist as purple is to lavender.

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