European Christianity (not taking doctoral students at present)

The study of the history of Christianity in Europe since 1300 has two tracks:

  1.  Christianity in Reformation Europe

  2.  Modern European Christianity

Track 1: Christianity in Reformation Europe

Reformation studies are placed in the context of the history of Christianity in Europe from 1300 to 1700. A major field is defined more by level of competence than by course credits. Normally, a student majoring in this field will have participated in at least four advanced seminars or reading courses, presented evidence of a reading knowledge of German, Latin and French, prepared a reading list approved by the student's doctoral committee, and sustained a preliminary examination in the field.

Following the successful completion of preliminary examinations students will prepare and defend a dissertation according the normal procedures of the Graduate School and the standards of the Graduate Program in Religion.

Languages

Prior to taking preliminary examinations students will demonstrate by examination a satisfactory reading knowledge of Latin, German, and French. Students may also be encouraged to develop a reading knowledge of other languages important for their research or to learn paleographic skills.

Internal Minor

Students will elect a minor field in the Graduate Program in Religion and will meet its requirements according to the guidelines established by that field. This minor may be in any field chosen by students and approved by their doctoral committee.

External Minor

Students will elect a minor field in a department or program other than Religion; e.g., history, English, or philosophy. Ordinarily they will elect two courses in the external minor and sustain a three hour preliminary examination administered by a faculty member from the outside field.

Course Load: The normal course load for a student in this field is three advanced courses per semester. Courses aimed at the development of the reading knowledge of a language are not counted in the normal course load, even if academic credit is given.

Preliminary Examinations

In consultation with their advisory committees students will prepare reading lists that will serve as the basis for their preliminary examinations.

Students will sit for four examinations:

 1.  a four hour examination in Reformation studies testing general mastery of the field and the methods and materials particularly relevant to their dissertation topic

2.  a three hour examination in second field of the history of Christianity

3.  a three hour examination in any relevant field in Religion on which the student has not been examined

4.  a three hour examination in any relevant field outside Religion.

The written examinations will be followed by an oral examination as specified in the by-laws.

Dissertation

Following prelims students will submit a dissertation proposal to their doctoral committees. Once the proposal has been agreed to, students will prepare and defend their dissertations according the normal procedures of the Graduate School and the standards of the Graduate Program in Religion.

Track 1: Requirements for a Minor

A student electing to minor in this field will have participated in at least two advanced seminars or reading courses, presented evidence of a reading knowledge of at least one relevant language other than English, prepared a reading list approved by the student's doctoral committee, and sustained a three hour examination in the field. Students who complete a successful minor ought to be able to teach an introductory course in Reformation studies.

Track 2: Modern European Christianity

Studies in Modern European Christianity focus on the history of Christianity in Europe since the Reformation. A major field is defined more by level of competence than by course credits. Normally, a student majoring in this field will have participated in at least four advanced seminars or reading courses, presented evidence of a reading knowledge of German and French, prepared a reading list approved by the student's doctoral committee, and sustained a preliminary examination in the field.

Following the successful completion of preliminary examinations students will prepare and defend a dissertation according the normal procedures of the Graduate School and the standards of the Graduate Program in Religion.

Languages: Prior to taking preliminary examinations students will demonstrate by examination a satisfactory reading knowledge of German and French. Students may also be encouraged to develop a reading knowledge of other languages important for their research or to learn paleographic skills.

Internal Minor: Students will elect a minor field in the Graduate Program in Religion and will meet its requirements according to the guidelines established by that field. This minor may be in any field chosen by students and approved by their doctoral committee.

External Minor: Students will elect a minor field in a department or program other than Religion; e.g., history, English, or philosophy. Ordinarily they will elect two courses in the external minor and sustain a three hour preliminary examination administered by a faculty member from the outside field.

Course Load: The normal course load for a student in this field is three advanced courses per semester. Courses aimed at the development of the reading knowledge of a language are not counted in the normal course load, even if academic credit is given.

Preliminary Examinations: In consultation with their advisory committees students will prepare reading lists that will serve as the basis for their preliminary examinations.

Students will sit for four examinations:

  1. a four hour examination in modern European Christianity testing general mastery of the field and the methods and materials particularly relevant to the dissertation topic
  2. a three hour examination in a second field in the history of Christianity
  3. a three hour examination in any relevant field in Religion on which the student has not been examined
  4. a three hour examination in any relevant field outside Religion.

The written examinations will be followed by an oral examination as specified in the by-laws.

Dissertation: Following prelims students will submit a dissertation proposal to their doctoral committees. Once the proposal has been agreed to, students will prepare and defend their dissertations according the normal procedures of the Graduate School and the standards of the Graduate Program in Religion.

Track 2: Requirements for a Minor

A student electing to minor in this field will have participated in at least two advanced seminars or reading courses, presented evidence of a reading knowledge of at least one relevant language other than English, prepared a reading list approved by the student's doctoral committee, and sustained a three hour examination in the field. Students who complete a successful minor ought to be able to teach an introductory course in Modern European Christianity.