Duke Forum

We’ve seen that Duke’s social culture is shaped by forces of choice, attitude, and structure. As we think about desired change, we must consider…

  • Would radical structural change, like an on-campus bar or dance club, or dorms without selective living sections, enable cultural shifts that would leave more people satisfied? On the other hand, would more selective living, including sorority sections and houses, create more gender equality?
  • Why do Shooters, Devines, Metro 8, and Georges constitute the extent of many Duke’s students’ vision of Durham?
  • Would improving our town-gown relationships improve our social culture? If more buses around town were offered, would you venture into Durham more often?
  • Can students work together to create effective change with a grassroots, movement, or do administrators need to be involved? Does there need to be a single leader of the movement towards change or can everyone involved exercise leadership together to spur change?
  • How can we build upon organizations that have already made meaningful change in the social culture?
  • Is pressure and stress about your future stopping you from engaging in meaningful relationships?
  • Is there a double standard between genders within the hookup culture? If so, how can this be changed without comprising the hookup culture as a whole?
  • How do other pressures (academic, social, financial) on Duke’s campus play into the hookup culture?
  • How does the hookup culture influence or relationships, romantic and platonic, after Duke?
  • As people tend to stick within the same social groups, does the hookup culture limit people’s potential for both platonic and romantic relationships with people outside of their social circle?
  • Does the hookup culture only affect those who choose to participate? How might the hookup culture still impact those who opt-out?
  • Why do Duke students often follow a different set of priorities and hold different values on weekdays versus weekend nights? How should we reconcile those two identities?
  • What can campus organizations do to promote a more meaningful social scene? In general, what should b done at the structural and policy level to shape Duke’s social culture?


If you’d like to start making change in Duke’s social relationship culture, you don’t have to start form scratch. Many students and campus groups and organizations have already worked to build a support system for promoting a more healthy, safe, and fulfilling social environment. Try collaborating with these groups:


Resources for aid:

CAPS (Counseling and Psychological Services)

919-660-1000 Page Building 214 Page Building http://caps.studentaffairs.duke.edu/about_us/index.html

Durham Police Department

919-560-4427

Women’s Center Sexual Assault Support

919-684-3897

SafeRides

919-684-3897 (SAFE)

Duke Police

919-684-2444 502 Oregon Street
http://www.duke.edu/web/police

Duke Student Health (and Healhty Devils, ESTEEM, etc)

919-681-WELL (9355)
Duke Clinic, Trent Drive
Sub Basement, Orange Zone
HealthyD@mc.duke.edu
http://healthydevil.studentaffairs.duke.edu/index.html

Resources Working For Change

Center for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Life

02 West Union Building
919-684-6607
http://lgbt.studentaffairs.duke.edu/index.html

Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life

919-684-9401
07 Bryan Center
http://greek.studentaffairs.duke.edu

Center for Race Relations

919-681-7565 0010 Bryan Center
www.duke.edu/web/racerelations

Women’s Center

919-684-3897
Few Dormitory
http://wc.studentaffairs.duke.edu/index.html

THIS DOCUMENT WAS MADE POSSIBLE IN PART BY A GRANT FROM THE KENAN INSTITUTE FOR ETHICS.


If you’re interested in discussing the issues addressed and questions posed in this zine, please contact us at dukelife2010@gmail.com, or get in touch with one of the resources above. Thanks for taking the time to read this e-zine and we hope you find your own way to keep the dialogue going --2008 Women as Leaders Seminar.