Human Rights Photographs Formatted title of Duke Human Rights Center Formatted quote about Human Rights

Fall 2008 DHRC Events Calendar

Unless noted, all events are free and open to the public.
For parking information, please consult the campus map at map.duke.edu

2008 Dec 2
Remzije Istrefi, "The human rights situation in Kosovo under the United Nations Administration (UNMIK)"
A talk by Remzije Istrefi, a Fulbright scholar with the Duke Human Rights Center
12 noon to 1:15 pm - Tuesday, December 2nd - Franklin 130/132
Free and open to the public - Lunch provided
2008 Nov 17
Francisco Goldman, "The Art of Political Murder"
Place and time: TBA
2008 Nov 12
Gareth Higgins, "The war on terror and the terror of war: What the President-elect needs to learn from the Irish peace process"
12 noon to 1:00 pm - Wednesday at the Center, Franklin 240
Free and open to the public - Lunch provided - Parking vouchers for the medical deck are available at the event
2008 Oct 29
Louis Bickford, "Remembering Past Atrocity: Monuments, Memorials and Museums in Comparative Perspective"
12 noon to 1:00 pm - Wednesday at the Center, Franklin 240
Free and open to the public - Lunch provided - Parking vouchers for the medical deck are available at the event
2008 Oct 23
James Nickel, "Making Sense of Human Rights"
More information TBA
2008 Oct 16 - Jan 4
Scenes of Secrecy Multi-Media Art Exhibition: Center for Documentary Studies
October 16 through January 4
Check the CDS calendar for details: cds.aas.duke.edu
See Scenes of Secrecy: Interdisciplinary Inquiries on Suspicion, Intelligence, and Security
2008 Oct 17-18
Scenes of Secrecy: Interdisciplinary Inquiries on Suspicion, Intelligence, and Security
October 17 through October 18
All sessions are free and open to the public. Intersession refreshments will be provided.
9:00 am to 6:00 pm - Panels and Roundtable Sessions - Nelson Music Room and East Duke Parlors, East Duke Building - Duke University
2008 Oct 6
Adam Hochschild, "Freeing an Empire's Slaves"
5:00 pm to 8:00 pm, with a reception following the talk - Love Auditorium (in the Levine Science Research Center, maps.duke.edu/?bid=7776)
Free and open to the public - Parking available in the Bryan Center deck - map.duke.edu
2008 Oct 5
A New Partnership: The Franklin Humanities Institute Welcomes The Duke Human Rights Center
In August 2008, the Duke Human Rights Center (DHRC) became an official affiliate of the Franklin Humanities Institute. To mark the inauguration of this partnership, the FHI and the DHRC will present a series of public events in October 2008. The events are cosponsored by the office of the vice-provost for interdisciplinary studies, the Duke University Center for International Studies, the Archive for Human Rights and African and African American Studies (AAAS).
"In The Name Of Humanity: Atlantic Slavery, Leopold's Congo And The Legacy Of Early Human Rights Pioneers"
2008 Oct 5
"King Leopold's Ghost" screening
6:00 pm to 9:00 pm - Griffith Film Theater - Free and open to the public
Parking available in the Bryan Center deck - map.duke.edu
2008 Sep 24
Michael E. Tigar, "A Human Rights Agenda for the New Administration: Accountability and Engagement"
12 noon to 1:00 pm - Wednesday at the Center, Franklin 240
Free and open to the public - Lunch provided - Parking vouchers for the medical deck are available at the event
2008 Sep 18
Fiona Terry, "Doing Good and Doing Harm: The Paradox of Humanitarian Action"
5:00 pm (seating available at 4:30 pm) - Reception to follow - Fleishman Commons, Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy
Free and open to the public
2008 Sep 3 - Oct 1
Scenes of Secrecy Film series: Griffith Theater (Bryan Center)
Wednesday evenings, September 3 through October 1
Check the Screen/Society calendar for details: fvd.aas.duke.edu/screensociety/
See Scenes of Secrecy: Interdisciplinary Inquiries on Suspicion, Intelligence, and Security
Archives
To see prior DHRC events calendars click here
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Thursday, September 18, 2008

Fiona Terry, "Doing Good and Doing Harm: The Paradox of Humanitarian Action"

Long-time rights activist Fiona Terry will deliver the 2008 Kenan Distinguished Lecture in Ethics. Terry will discuss her analysis of the ethical dimensions of the humanitarian aid system, drawing both on her book Condemned to Repeat? and her recent work in Myanmar and the Sudan. Terry has spent the past 15 years involved in humanitarian relief operations in different parts of the world, including in Northern Iraq, Somalia, the Great Lakes region of Africa, Liberia, and along the Sino-Korean border. From 2000 to 2003 she worked as a research director with Doctors without Borders in Paris before spending three years in Myanmar (Burma) with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). She is currently based in Sudan, working as an independent researcher conducting a study for the ICRC. Terry holds a PhD in international relations and political science from the Australian National University. The annual Kenan Lecture brings a distinguished speaker to campus to address moral issues of broad social and cultural significance. The event is sponsored by the Kenan Institute for Ethics and co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center. More information and additional sponsors at kenan.ethics.duke.edu/events/.

5:00 pm (seating available at 4:30 pm) - Reception to follow - Fleishman Commons, Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy

Free and open to the public

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Michael Tigar, "A Human Rights Agenda for the New Administration: Accountability and Engagement"

Noted defense attorney and long-time human rights activist, Michael E. Tigar will lay out what he believes to be the human rights challenge for a new administration in Washington. Tigar will discuss accountability for the Bush/Cheney human rights abuses. He will also address what he sees as the underlying motivation for human rights violations, which is a foreign and military policy aimed at controlling key resources in a time of increasing scarcity. Tigar is a Professor of the Practice of Law at Duke University School of Law. He has authored or co-authored twelve books, three plays, and scores of articles and essays. He has argued seven cases in the United States Supreme Court, about one hundred federal appeals, and has tried cases in all parts of the country in state and federal courts. His latest book is Thinking About Terrorism: The Threat to Civil Liberties in Times of National Emergency and he has also published a memoir, Fighting Injustice. His clients have included Angela Davis, H. Rap Brown, John Connally, Kay Bailey Hutchison, the Washington Post, Fantasy Films, Terry Nichols, Allen Ginsberg, Leonard Peltier, the Charleston Five, Fernando Chavez and Lynne Stewart. He worked with South African lawyers engaged in the struggle to end apartheid, and after the release of Nelson Mandela from prison, advised the African National Congress on a new constitution. He has been actively involved in efforts to bring to justice members of the Chilean junta, including former President Pinochet. Of Mr. Tigar's career, Justice William J. Brennan has written that his "tireless striving for justice stretches his arms towards perfection."

12 noon to 1:00 pm - Wednesday at the Center, Franklin 240

Free and open to the public - Lunch provided - Parking vouchers for the medical deck are available at the event

Sunday, October 5, 2008

"King Leopold's Ghost" screening

The series begins with a screening of the award-winning documentary film King Leopold's Ghost, directed by Pippa Scott and based on the acclaimed book by Adam Hochschild. With narration by Don Cheadle, Alfre Woodard and James Cromwell, the film recounts the genocidal plunder of the Congo by Belgian King Leopold II. Under his greedy reign, over 10 million people died, a tragedy that has grim echoes today. Winner of several awards, the film includes original footage from the Congo and Belgium as well as archival materials. The screening will be followed by a panel featuring film director Pippa Scott and journalist Adam Hochschild. The screening is cosponsored with the Film/Video/Digital Program.

6:00 pm to 9:00 pm - Griffith Film Theater

Free and open to the public - Parking available in the Bryan Center deck - map.duke.edu

Monday, October 6, 2008

Adam Hochschild, "Freeing an Empire's Slaves"

Award-winning journalist Adam Hochschild will speak about his recent work on the Abolitionist movement in 19th-century Great Britain. Hochschild's most recent book is Bury the Chains: The British Struggle to Abolish Slaveryhttp://www.amazon.co.uk/Bury-Chains-British-Struggle-Abolish/dp/0330485814, one of the inspirations for the film "Amazing Grace." He also authored King Leopold's Ghost, the basis for this film. A co-founder of Mother Jones magazine, Hochschild has also written for The New Yorker, Harper's, the New York Review of Books and The Nation. Hochschild teaches writing at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley.

5:00 pm to 8:00 pm, with a reception following the talk - Love Auditorium (in the Levine Science Research Center, maps.duke.edu/?bid=7776)

Free and open to the public - Parking available in the Bryan Center deck - map.duke.edu

Wednesday, October 8, 2008

Lea Fridman in conversation with John Hope Franklin

The final event in the series returns to King Leopold's Congo to explore an African American's remarkable role in exposing its horrors and calling the Belgian monarch to account internationally. Noted historian John Hope Franklin, for whom the FHI is named, will talk with holocaust studies scholar Lea Fridman about the life and work of George Washington Williams, an African American writer, historian, legislator, and pioneer of the keystone human rights concept of "crimes against humanity." Franklin is the author of George Washington Williams: A Biography, winner of the Clarence L. Holte Literary Prize, which traces Franklin's forty-year quest to find information about Williams. Professor of English at City University of New York, Fridman has published many scholarly works and a play on the Holocaust. Her current research project focuses on Williams' "Open Letter to King Leopold."

12 noon to 1:00 pm - Wednesday at the Center, Franklin 240

Free and open to the public - Lunch provided - Parking vouchers for the medical deck are available at the event

Friday October 17 and Saturday October 18, 2008

Scenes of Secrecy: Interdisciplinary Inquiries on Suspicion, Intelligence, and Security

At this moment of polarizing conflict on the complex frontiers of global war, "security" both defines and legitimates the defense of state sovereignty against domestic and transnational insurgencies. This conference takes part in the growing public scrutiny of methods employed by states and their proxies to gather intelligence in this context - methods, from surveillance to torture, that have often prioritized security over human rights and even human life. At the same time as these methods work to reveal clandestine agendas and actions against the state, they are, themselves, largely practiced covertly. With a view to developing comparative methods of research and analysis, this conference traces connections between the geo-political terrains of invisible statecraft, and the local experiences of terror and suspicion that fuel the urgency of political secrecy and transparency.

Participants include:

  • Patricia Clough
    (CUNY-Graduate Center)
  • Miriam Cooke
    (Duke University)
  • Robert Corber
    (Trinity College)
  • Elizabeth Davis
    (Duke University)
  • Gregory Flaxman
    (UNC-Chapel Hill)
  • Susan Gal
    (University of Chicago)
  • Jehanne Gheith
    (Duke University)
  • Erdag Göknar
    (Duke University)
  • Hugh Gusterson
    (George Mason University)
  • Lisa Hajjar
    (UC Santa Barbara)
  • Joseph Masco
    (University of Chicago)
  • Jody McAuliffe
    (Duke University)
  • Timothy Melley
    (Miami University)
  • Diane Nelson
    (Duke University)
  • Jackie Orr
    (Syracuse University)
  • Trevor Paglen
    (UC Berkeley)
  • Stefania Pandolfo
    (UC Berkeley)
  • Neni Panourgiá
    (Columbia University)
  • Elizabeth Povinelli
    (Columbia University)
  • Jaya Ramji-Nogales
    (Temple University)
  • Anupama Rao
    (Barnard College)

All sessions are free and open to the public. Intersession refreshments will be provided.

Panels and Roundtable Sessions, 9:00 am to 6:00 pm - Nelson Music Room and East Duke Parlors, East Duke Building - Duke University

Scenes of Secrecy Multi-Media Art Exhibition: Center for Documentary Studies.

October 16-January 4

Featuring photography and video work by William Noland and Trevor Paglen, a surveillance technology installation, and a documentary exhibit by members of "North Carolina Stop Torture Now." Check the CDS calendar for details: cds.aas.duke.edu/

Scenes of Secrecy Film series: Griffith Theater (Bryan Center).

Wednesday evenings, September 3-October 1.

Check the Screen/Society calendar for details: fvd.aas.duke.edu/screensociety/

Hosted by the Department of Cultural Anthropology and the Duke Human Rights Center. Co-sponsored by the Provost's Common Fund, the Visual Studies Initiative, the Arts & Sciences Research Council, and the Josiah Charles Trent Memorial Foundation.

Thursday, October 23, 2008

James Nickel, "Making Sense of Human Rights"

A philosopher at the Arizona State University College of Law, Nickel is the author of "Making Sense of Human Rights," considered major contribution to the philosophical study of human rights. The book explains and defends the conception of human rights found in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and subsequent human rights treaties. Combining philosophical, legal and political approaches, Nickel addresses questions about what human rights are, what their content should be, and whether and how they can be justified.

12:15 to 1:20 pm - Room 3041, Duke Law School

Free and open to the public - Parking map at map.duke.edu

Sponsored by the Duke Law Center for International & Comparative Law (CICL) and co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center

Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Louis Bickford, "Remembering Past Atrocity: Monuments, Memorials and Museums in Comparative Perspective"

Louis Bickford directs both the Policymakers and Civil Society Unit and the Memory, Museums and Monuments Program at the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ). A political scientist, he has consulted with governments, NGOs, human rights activists, and democratic movements on strategies for confronting the legacies of past abuse in more than a dozen countries. Sponsored by the Archives for Human Rights and co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center.

12 noon to 1:00 pm - Wednesday at the Center, Franklin 240

Free and open to the public - Lunch provided - Parking vouchers for the medical deck are available at the event

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Gareth Higgins, "The war on terror and the terror of war: What the President-elect needs to learn from the Irish peace process"

Recent debate among US policy makers about "talking with the enemy" in Iran and North Korea harkens back to US engagement in the Northern Irish peace process, which depended on difficult but ultimately successful negotiation with violent groups, in this case the Irish Republican Army and Loyalist paramilitaries. Higgins grew up in conflict-torn Belfast and reflects on his personal experience of the conflict and the promotion of dialogue. Born in Belfast, Higgins is an author and has taught Sociology and Reconciliation Studies at Queen's University Belfast and Trinity College Dublin. From 1998-2007 he was the director of the zero28 project, an innovative post-sectarian peace-building initiative. Higgins is the co-author, with John Brewer, of Anti-Catholicism in Northern Ireland (St Martin's Press) and How Movies Helped Save My Soul: Finding Spiritual Fingerprints in Culturally Significant Films (Relevant Books).

12 noon to 1:00 pm - Wednesday at the Center, Franklin 240

Free and open to the public - Lunch provided - Parking vouchers for the medical deck are available at the event

Week of November 17, 2008

Francisco Goldman, "The Art of Political Murder"

Novelist Francisco Goldman is the winner of the first Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA)- Duke University Book Award, meant to honor the best non-fiction work on Latin America published the previous year that deals with human rights and social justice. In part, the award recognizes a new partnership between WOLA and Duke, which houses the group's institutional archives. Goldman's book, published by Grove Press, recounts the 1998 killing of Bishop Juan Gerardi, four days after he and a group of lawyers presented a devastating report on human rights abuses committed by the Guatemalan military against civilians, and the trial of several military officers for the assassination. The judges were unanimous in their praise for Goldman's book as not only well-written but researched with a rigor that will inform both Guatemala experts and general scholars of Latin American Studies. The event is sponsored by the Archives for Human Rights and the Duke Human Rights Center and co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies and the Regulator Book store, which will have copies of Goldman's book available for sale and signing after his reading.

7:00 pm - Rare Book Room, Perkins Library

Free and open to the public - A reception will follow the reading

Parking is available in the Bryan Center deck - map.duke.edu

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

Remzije Istrefi, "The human rights situation in Kosovo under the United Nations Administration (UNMIK)"

A talk by Remzije Istrefi, a Fulbright scholar with the Duke Human RightsCenter

Remzije Istrefi lectures in the Political Science department at the University of Pristina and publishes frequently on human rights issues. Her main interest is in the development of Kosovar legislation on human rights. She worked for the Council for Defending Human Rights and Freedoms in Mitrovica and also advised several international and national institutions including the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the United Nations Development Program, the European Committee on Minority Issues, the Kosovo Judicial Institute and the Kosovar Institute for Public Administration. As a war refugee, she also worked with World Vision in Montenegro as monitoring assistant. She received her L.L.M on International Human Rights Law from the University of Notre Dame and her B.A. from the Faculty of Law in the University of Pristina.

Cosponsored by the Duke University Center for International Studies, the Center for Slavic and Eurasian Studies and the Duke Human Rights Center

Noon to 1:15pm - Franklin 130/132

Free and open to the public - Lunch provided - Please RSVP to Rights@Duke.edu

Location: www.jhfc.duke.edu/about/map.php

Duke Human Rights Center - rights@duke.edu
235 John Hope Franklin Center, Franklin Humanities Institute
2204 Erwin Rd., Box 90403, Duke University
Durham, NC 27708-0403
Voice: 1-919-668-6511 Fax: 1-919-668-1919

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