Human Rights Photographs Formatted title of Duke Human Rights Center Formatted quote about Human Rights

Duke Human Rights Center Faculty

  • Catherine A. Admay
    Visiting Professor
    Duke Center for International Development
    Sanford Institute of Public Policy

  • Srinivas Aravamudan
    Professor, Department of English
    Director of the Franklin Humanities Institute

  • Robert Cook-Deegan
    Director, IGSP Center for Genome Ethics, Law & Policy

  • Ariel Dorfman
    Walter Hines Page Chair of Literature and
    Latin American Studies

  • Robin Kirk
    Duke Human Rights Center Director
    (www.robinkirk.com)

  • Claudia Koonz
    Professor
    Department of History

  • Anirudh Krishna
    Associate Professor
    Public Policy and Political Science

  • Ebrahim Moosa
    Associate Professor
    Department of Religion

  • Jocelyn Olcott
    Associate Professor

  • Suzanne Shanahan
    Associate Director, Kenan Institute for Ethics
    Assistant Professor of Sociology

  • Orin Starn
    Sally Dalton Robinson Professor of Cultural Anthropology
    Department of Cultural Anthropology
    Faculty Director, Duke Human Rights Center

  • Patrick Stawski
    Human Rights Archivist, Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library of Perkins Library

  • Michael Tigar
    Professor of the Practice of Law

  • Guillermo Trejo
    Assistant Professor
    Department of Political Science
     

 

Catherine A. Admay
Visiting Professor
Departments of Public Policy and Political Science

Admay received her JD and BA (Philosophy, magna cum laude) from Yale Law School (1992) and Yale College (1988). She taught at NYU Law School (1994-96) and Duke Law School (1996-2002) before joining, as visiting faculty, the departments of Political Science and Public Policy/Duke Center for International Development. Admay is a Faculty Affiliate to Duke's Global Health Institute. Her teaching and research interests are in the areas of public international law and international politics, human rights at home and abroad, law and development, global health and international law, conflict and human rights, and interdisciplinary engagements with law (ethics, arts, political theory).

Admay worked for the Legal Resources Centre in Pretoria and Gazankulu, South Africa, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, the Office of the Legal Advisor in the United States Department of State, and with private law firms in Washington, D.C. and Seattle. She clerked for Judge Betty Fletcher of the United States Court of Appeals on the 9th Circuit in Seattle, Washington.

Srinivas Aravamudan
Professor, Department of English
Director of the Franklin Humanities Institute

Srinivas Aravamudan gained his PhD at Cornell University and has taught at the University of Utah, and at the University of Washington. He joined the Duke English Department in the Fall of 2000. He specializes in eighteenth century British and French literature and in postcolonial literature and theory. He is the author of essays in Diacritics, ELH, Social Text, Novel, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Anthropological Forum, South Atlantic Quarterly and other venues. His study, Tropicopolitans: Colonialism and Agency, 1688-1804 (1999, Duke University Press) won the outstanding first book prize of the Modern Language Association in 2000. He has also edited Slavery, Abolition and Emancipation: Writings of the British Romantic Period: Volume VI Fiction (1999, Pickering and Chatto). His book, Guru English: South Asian Religion in A Cosmopolitan Language was published by Princeton University Press in January 2006, and republished by Penguin India in 2007. He is working on two book-length studies, one on the eighteenth-century French and British oriental tale, and the other on sovereignty and anachronism. His edition of William Earle's antislavery romance, entitled Obi: or, The History of Three-Fingered Jack appeared in 2005 with Broadview Press.

Publications

Robert Cook-Deegan
Director, IGSP Center for Genome Ethics, Law & Policy

Dr. Cook-Deegan was a member of the Board of Directors, Physicians for Human Rights, 1988-96, with whom he participated in human rights missions to Turkey, Iraq and Panama. He helped write reports on human rights in Iraq, Panama, and several publications on health and human rights in medical journals. He was a national health professional coordinator for Amnesty International USA (AIUSA) 1983-9, and group leader for the Denver chapter (group 60) of AIUSA 1979-81, and has been a member of AIUSA's Urgent Action Network since 1978.

He has been the Director of the IGSP's Center for Genome Ethics, Law & Policy since July, 2002, when he came to Duke. He was previously director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellowship program at the Institute of Medicine (IOM), National Academy of Sciences, a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Investigator at Georgetown University 1999-2002, and a seminar leader at Stanford-in-Washington 1996-2003. He worked at The National Academies in various capacities from 1991 until coming to Duke.

He is the author of The Gene Wars: Science, Politics, and the Human Genome (New York: Norton, 1994; paperback 1996; tr. Korean 1995, Japanese 1996) and an author on over 200 articles.

In 1996, Dr. Cook-Deegan was a Cecil and Ida Green Fellow at the University of Texas, Dallas, following his work in the report Allocating Federal Funds for Science and Technology (the "Press Report"). From 1991-4, he directed IOM' s Division of Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders. He worked for the National Center for Human Genome Research 1989-90, after serving Acting Executive Director of the Biomedical Ethics Advisory Committee of the U.S. Congress 1988-9. Dr. Cook-Deegan was a AAAS Congressional Science & Engineering Fellow 1982-3 and spent six years at the congressional Office of Technology Assessment. This followed two years of postdoctoral research on the molecular biology of oncogenes with Lasker Award scientist Raymond L. Erikson, after completing his internship in pathology at the University of Colorado 1979-82. He received his MD degree from the University of Colorado in 1979 and his bachelor' s degree in chemistry, magna cum laude, in 1975 from Harvard College.

Ariel Dorfman
Walter Hines Page Research Professor of Literature and Latin American Studies

Ariel Dorfman is a Chilean-American poet, novelist, playwright and human rights activist. He has received numerous international awards, including the Sudamericana Award for novel, the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Play (Death and the Maiden, which has been made into a feature film by Roman Polanski), and two awards from the Kennedy Center. His books, written both in Spanish and English, have been translated into more than 40 languages and his plays have been staged in over 100 countries. His memoir Heading South, Looking North was the basis for an award-winning documentary film, "A Promise to the Dead: The Exile Journey of Ariel Dorfman," directed by Peter Raymont. He is also a regular contributor to the major newspapers of the world.

DUKE HUMAN RIGHTS CENTER DIRECTOR
Robin Kirk
(www.robinkirk.com)

An award-winning author and human rights activist, Robin Kirk is a visiting lecturer at Duke University and coordinates the Duke Human Rights Center. Kirk frequently speaks about Latin America, human rights and U.S. policy. Kirk also works as an investigator on capital cases. Kirk authored, co-authored and edited over twelve reports for Human Rights Watch. In the 1980s, Kirk reported for U.S. media from Peru, where she covered the war between the government and the Shining Path. During that time, she also prepared reports for the U.S. Committee on Refugees, including the first report ever on the plight of Peru's internally displaced people. The Decade of Chaqwa was followed by a second report, To Build Anew, dealing with the effort of some displaced families to return to their homes. Kirk also authored the first report chronicling the plight of the forcibly displaced in Colombia, Feeding the Tiger. Kirk is a former Radcliffe Bunting Fellow and is a past winner of the Media Alliance Meritorious Achievement Award for Freelance Writing. Her books include More Terrible Than Death: Massacres, Drugs and America's War in Colombia (Public Affairs, 2003) and The Monkey's Paw: New Chronicles from Peru (University of Massachusetts Press, 1997).

Claudia Koonz
Professor
Department of History

Claudia Koonz's interests are in 20th Century German History, Women's History, and genocide. She has received research support from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller Foundations, the Wilson Center, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the German-Marshall Fund, Duke University, the American Council for Learned Societies and the National Humanities Center. Her book Mothers in the Fatherland received several awards: as a finalist for the National Book Award non-fiction nomination, 1987; The Boston Globe-Winship Book of the Year Award, 1987; The Berkshire Conference 1987 Book Award; and it was one of the New York Times and Liberation's (Paris) best 100 books of 1987 and 1990, respectively. Her book, The Nazi Conscience (2003), has been translated into Spanish, Japanese, and Russian. She is currently writing a transnational study of the debates about the Muslim headscarf in France, Britain, and Germany. During the fall semester OF 2008, she is teaching at Venice International University.

Recent Publications

Anirudh Krishna
Associate Professor of Public Policy and Political Science

Krishna's research investigates how poor communities and individuals in developing countries cope with the structural and personal constraints that result in poverty and powerlessness. For the past seven years, he has been examining poverty dynamics at the household level, tracking movements into and out of poverty of over 35,000 households in a varied group of nearly 400 communities of India, Kenya, Uganda, Peru and North Carolina, USA. He has published more than forty journal articles and book chapters. Books include Poverty, Participation and Democracy: A Global Perspective (Cambridge University Press, 2008); Active Social Capital: Tracing the Roots of Development and Democracy (Columbia University Press, 2002); Changing Policy and Practice From Below: Community Experiences in Poverty Reduction (United Nations Press, 2000); Reasons for Success: Learning From Instructive Experiences in Rural Development (Kumarian Press, 1998), and Reasons for Hope: Instructive Experiences in Rural Development (Kumarian Press, 1997). Before turning to academia, Krishna worked for 14 years in the Indian Administrative Service, where he managed diverse initiatives related to rural and urban development.

Ebrahim Moosa
Associate Professor
Department of Religion

Ebrahim E.I. Moosa joined Duke University in the fall of 2001. With interests in Islamic thought, especially Islamic law, ethics, theology and critical theory Ebrahim Moosa is associate research professor in the department of religion and co-director of the Center for Study of Muslim Networks. Prior to Duke he spent three years 1998-2001 as visiting professor at Stanford University, California and prior to that he taught at the University of Cape Town in his native South Africa. He has a PhD from the University of Cape Town. He received his first degree, known as the alimiyya degree from Nadwatul Ulama, Lucknow, India where he received extensive training in the traditional Islamic sciences.

After completing his studies in India he worked as a journalist in the United Kingdom for Arabia: The Islamic World Review and later as staff writer for MEED (Middle East Economic Digest) and also as a political writer for the Cape Times in South Africa. He joined the teaching faculty in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Cape Town in 1989 and completed his doctoral studies on the confluence of language and theology in the legal thought of the 12th century Muslim thinker, Abu Hamid al-Ghazali (d.1111).

He is the author of many published essays in Islamic thought ranging from issues in ethics and law covering topics such as human rights, women's rights, Muslim family law, medical ethics and political ethics to historical studies that deal with questions of Qur'an exegesis and medieval Islamic law and philosophy. He is especially interested in the way religious traditions encounter modernity and the way new conceptions of history and culture dialogically engages with the Islamic heritage.

Currently he is finishing a manuscript called: A Poetics of Imagination: Ghazali and the Construction of Muslim Thought that explores the ideas of one of the foremost thinkers of medieval Islam. Another book in the making is provisionally titled After Empire: Rethinking Islam in (Post) Modernity. Here he explores the major ethical questions that a tradition-in-the making like Islam experiences in a rapidly changing world, where Muslims are located in different settings and face new and extraordinary challenges. The political and historical settings against which Islam functions in the modern world is carefully addressed in this work and how what kinds of resources the tradition offers and what kinds of responses would be appropriate. He also edited and wrote an introduction to the last manuscript of the late Professor Fazlur Rahman, Revival and Reform in Islam: A Study of Islamic Fundamentalism (Oxford: Oneworld, 2000), a work that explores the intellectual history on which modern Islamic fundamentalism basis its claims.

Moosa has worked extensively in the field of Islamic thought, rethinking Islam in modernity and has met with foremost thinkers, activists and role-players in the Muslim world. He also has had extensive experience in collaborating in human rights causes in the anti-apartheid struggle and he is considered to be among the foremost figures of a new generation of Muslim thinkers.

Jocelyn Olcott
Associate Professor

Olcott works on feminist history of modern Mexico. Her first book, Revolutionary Women in Postrevolutionary Mexico, explores questions of gender and citizenship in the 1930s. She is currently working on two book-length projects: a history of the 1975 UN International Women's Year Conference in Mexico City (under contract with Oxford University Press), and a biography of the activist and folksinger Concha Michel. She is also developing a long-term project on the labor, political, and conceptual history of motherhood in twentieth-century Mexico. She was named top Young Historian, History New Network, in April, 2007

Recent Publications

Suzanne Shanahan
Associate Director, Kenan Institute for Ethics
Assistant Professor of Sociology

Olcott works on feminist history of modern Mexico. Her first book, Revolutionary Women in Postrevolutionary Mexico, explores questions of gender and citizenship in the 1930s. She is currently working on two book-length projects: a history of the 1975 UN International Women's Year Conference in Mexico City (under contract with Oxford University Press), and a biography of the activist and folksinger Concha Michel. She is also developing a long-term project on the labor, political, and conceptual history of motherhood in twentieth-century Mexico. She was named top Young Historian, History New Network, in April, 2007

Bio to come

Orin Starn
Sally Dalton Robinson Professor of Cultural Anthropology
Department of Cultural Anthropology
Faculty Director, Duke Human Rights Center

Orin Starn is interested in themes of culture, history, and power, and specializes in Latin America and Native North America. His most recent book Ishi's Brain: In Search of America's Last "Wild' Indian" (W.W. Norton and Company, 2004) explores the story of this last survivor of California's Yahi tribe. It's the result of his research over the last few years in Native California, and explores questions about violence and conquest, the history of the West, and the relation between anthropology and indigenous peoples. Earlier, he did much of my work in the Andes of South America, mostly in Peru. His book Nightwatch: The Politics of Protest in the Andes (Duke University Press, 1999) recounts the history of a powerful rural movement that emerged in the 1980s. Here he took up issues related to political violence and national identity, social movements and modernity, and gender and power as they have played out in the Andes. His work in Peru also resulted in a co-edited book called The Peru Reader: History, Culture, and Politics (Duke University Press, 1995). He has also published or edited three books in Spanish, and co-edited an anthology about cultural politics and social protest, Between Resistance and Revolution: Cultural Politics and Social Protest (Rutgers University Press, 1997) and the more recent Indigenous Experience Today (2007). He is a former fellow at the National Humanities Center and the current chair of the Department of Cultural Anthropology.

Recent Publications

Patrick Stawski
Human Rights Archivist, Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library of Perkins Library

Stawski is a recent graduate of the UCLA Department of Information Studies and was working in the archives of the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority before coming to Duke. Mr. Stawski is working with library staff and Duke faculty to build and make available for research important collections of primary source materials in the area of human rights.

Michael E. Tigar
Professor of the Practice of Law

Michael E. Tigar is Professor of the Practice of Law at Duke University School of Law, and Professor Emeritus of Law at Washington College of Law, American University, Washington, D.C. He has held full-time academic positions at UCLA and The University of Texas. He has been a lecturer at dozens of law schools and bar associations in the United States, Europe, Africa, and Latin America, including service as Professeur Invité at the faculty of law of Université Paul-Cezanne, Aix-en-Provence. He is a 1966 graduate of Boalt Hall, University of California, Berkeley, where he was first in his class, Editor-in-Chief of the law review and Order of the Coif.

He has authored or co-authored twelve books, three plays, and scores of articles and essays. He has argued seven cases in the United States Supreme Court, about one hundred federal appeals, and has tried cases in all parts of the country in state and federal courts. His latest books are Thinking About Terrorism: The Threat to Civil Liberties in Times of National Emergency and Fighting Injustice. He has been active on several continents in promoting and protecting human rights.

His clients have included Angela Davis, H. Rap Brown, John Connally, Kay Bailey Hutchison, the Washington Post, Fantasy Films, Terry Nichols, Allen Ginsberg, Leonard Peltier, the Charleston Five, Fernando Chavez and Lynne Stewart. He has been Chair of the 60,000 member Section of Litigation of the American Bar Association, and Chair of the Board of Directors of the Texas Resource Center for Capital Litigation.

In his teaching, he has worked with law students in clinical programs where students are counsel or law clerks in significant human rights litigation. He has made several trips to South Africa, working with organizations of African lawyers engaged in the struggle to end apartheid, and after the release of Nelson Mandela from prison, to lecture on human rights issues and to advise the African National Congress on issues in drafting a new constitution. He has been actively involved in efforts to bring to justice members of the Chilean junta, including former President Pinochet. Of Mr. Tigar's career, Justice William J. Brennan has written that his "tireless striving for justice stretches his arms towards perfection."

In 1999, the California Attorneys for Criminal Justice held a ballot for "Lawyer of the Century." Mr. Tigar was third in the balloting, behind Clarence Darrow and Thurgood Marshall. In 2003, the Texas Civil Rights Project named its new building in Austin, Texas, (purchased with a gift from attorney Wayne Reaud) the "Michael Tigar Human Rights Center."

Guillermo Trejo
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science

Trejo specializes in comparative politics (social conflict, religion, ethnicity and democratization) and Latin American politics and society. His primary research analyzes the impact of religious competition and multi-party politics on the dynamics of social protest, rebellion and inter-communal violence among ethnic minorities in Mexico. He is also working on state repression and human rights violations of political dissidents and religious minorities during the Mexican transition to democracy. His work combines quantitative methods with analytic process-tracing and case studies.

Recent publications

Duke Human Rights Center - rights@duke.edu
235 John Hope Franklin Center, Franklin Humanities Institute
2204 Erwin Rd., Box 90403, Duke University
Durham, NC 27708-0403
Voice: 1-919-668-6511 Fax: 1-919-668-1919

This site designed and maintained by
Good Turn Web Design LLC