angelica
Angelica workers and students stand together, Fall 2005 outside of the Durham Angelica Laundry Plant. (Photo by Fernando Bribiezca)




cleanup
In the Spring of 2005, DSAS held a cleaning of the president's office and the outside of his building, "cleaning up" what Duke refused to--the safety violations that the NLRB charged against Angelica factory for endandering workers' lives.
(Photos by Marina Kukso)


foil
Following the clean up of the Allen Building, DSAS put tin foil around the presidents' office to show that the labor violations at Angelica reflect on the administration. (Photo by Marina Kukso)


Marching through campus in Fall of 2003, SAS, students, and farmworkers protest the Duke's refusal to act against the abuse and human rights violations of Mt. Olive cucumber pickers.
(Photo by Antony Cross)


Weekly Meetings >
Monday nights at 9:30PM in Social Sciences 119 (Suspended for summer)
 
Everyone is welcome to attend!

 

Previous Campaigns & Victories!

News: Duke bolsters policy against sweatshops, Duke Press Release,Duke signs new apparel policy, SAS's work pays off, A laudable endeavor, Fair weather fans,

News: Duke faces union dilemma with Angelica, Workers, supporters criticize corporation,Outsource draws ire from Duke students, Angelica protest hits quad, Workers, supporters criticize corporation, Duke's dirty laundry,Workers' rights need recognition, Health and Safety Major Issue of UNITE Organizing Campaign, Laundry has them in lather, Duke students try to 'foil' laundry deal,Tuesday's Angelica protest was appropriate, Laundry workers expect strike, Laundry workers put off strike; talks continue, Angelica strikes deal with union, Angelica, union reach agreement

Other Previous Campaigns AD (fall 2005)

to do

Following the victory of the farmworkers organizing with FLOC, Duke SAS took out the above ad in the Duke Chronicle outline where we have been and where we are going. Since then, the works at Angelica laundry have won their union, and Duke lead the way and adopted the first university stance on the industry changing phase-out of the multi-fiber agreement. However, this policy lacked needed mechanisms to ensure that companies wont cut-and-run from factories with an organized workforce and improved working conditions. In the Spring of 2006, this problem was addressed with the new Designated Suppliers Program which will provide the opposite incentative for corporations--to award their sourcing from factories where workers have a voice on the job and are paid a living wage. Next up: expanding these rights to all workers who work to make Duke work.

News on the historic NC farmworkers' victory:Duke lifts boycott of pickle company, Officials consider whether to boycott Mt. Olive pickles,Protesters: 'Say no to Mt. Olive', A Resolution of the National Council of the Churches, Mt. Olive boycott ends after 5 years,


   
     

Students Against Sweatshops www.duke.edu/web/usas